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REVIEW : Motospeed K87S Mechanical Keyboard

May 14, 2017

Mechanical Keyboards with underglow lighting has been a bit of a trend, but has Motospeed executed this feature?

 

 

CONTENTS

  • Motospeed K87S mechanical keyboard

  • Manual
     

LAYOUT & SIZE

 

This has 87 keys as the model name suggests, and basically just cuts off the numpad on the side. I highly recommend checking out tenkeyless keyboards for people first looking into getting a mechanical keyboard, as the numpad isn’t 100% necessary for many people.

It also gives you more space for your mouse, and allows for a more ergonomic experience.

 

DESIGN & BUILD

 

First of all it’s pretty simplistic in comparison to their other keyboards. It’s a simple rounded rectangular design. The top plate is a sleek silver aluminium, WITH no branding which is very very common on many budget mechanical keyboards.

 

There is no top exterior shell, so we have a floating key design, so the keyswitches are exposed from the sides. This is a personal taste thing if you like it or not. But the combination of a completely plastic shell, as well as an aluminium mounting plate rather than a heavier steel plate, makes the keyboard quite light. It doesn’t really have that traditional mechanical keyboard heft to it.

 

But the main attraction is this transparent plastic bottom shell. I checked out something similar from Velocifire, but they went a bit crazy with theirs. This one however is simplistic and how it should be.

 

Although on the bottom there’s some sort of white piece covering the bottom of the PCB. And then there’s this white frosted shell inside the case itself completely covering the internals. So it’s kind of like a case inside the case.

 

KEYCAPS


We have the white keycaps, but they have the gamery font on them. This is a gaming keyboard, so it’s fits the theme, but I just can never get behind the look of it. I prefer something more simple and clean, and it would have really complimented the rest of the keyboard.

 

We have 1mm thin double shot ABS keycaps. Double shot just means that the legends are a different piece of plastic, so they’ll never fade away.

 

LIGHTING

 

The lighting is split up into 2 parts. We have the key illumination on top, and the underglow lighting.

 

KEY ILLUMINATION

 

This is very similar to many budget keyboards. We can cycle through a few modes with function and insert. It is referred to as RGB, but it's limited to 7 colours. However it does have white, so it's fine for me.

 

UNDERGLOW

 

There are a couple of things I don’t. First of all the keycaps on top are just ugly in my opinion. It doesn’t contribute well to the aesthetic of the keyboard. That’s why I prefer the white backlighting in normal lit conditions, since it kind of blends in the legends, whereas having the lights off doesn’t.

 

I’m also not a fan of the diffusion of the underglow LEDs. They’re using a separate diffusion piece inside, but it looks quite thin, so while the light is spread, there’s still the clear points where the LEDs are, which are also made quite clear by the reflection on the table surface.

 

It would look so much better with the outer clear shell diffused, as well as being a bit thicker, like on the Ganns GK87 Pro, which is quite similar.

See video for lighting.

 

KEYSWITCHES

 

We have the very common budget Outemu Blue switches. These are just clones of the Cherry MX switches, and they mimic the colour characteristics as well. So these are tactile and clicky, with a travel distance of 4mm, but are a bit louder and clickier than Cherry MX Blues.

 

CONCLUSION

 

Overall it’s a unique product from Motospeed. It is a light keyboard with just the aluminium plate and the plastic case, but it’s still solid enough. And it’s nice to get a tenkeyless offering from Motospeed, instead of just full sized boards.

 

I think the aesthetic design is a bit mixed up as I explained, and it would be nice to get more budget boards without the gamery font on the keycaps.

 

But there’s definitely potential in the keyboard. The frost glass spray isn’t the cheapest here in Australia, at over 10 bucks. But in the U.S it can be had for around 5 dollars, and you’ll only be using a little bit, so I’ll get more out of mine. It also has a completely standard layout, so changing the keycaps can be an option in the future, giving it even more potential.

 

Thanks again to Banggood.com for providing the keyboard and being a long time supporter of the channel. 

 
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